Suillus grevillei var. badius

Larch Bolete (var. badius)

Status:

In western Scotland relatively Common. Scarce elsewhere.

Suillus meaning of swines (pigs). Grevillei after Robert Kaye Greville (Scottish mycologist and botanist).

Cap:

5-11cm

Stem:

6-12cm

Badius meaning bay-brown.

Description

In form the same as the typical 'yellow' form of the Larch Bolete (Suillus grevillei var. grevillei), but the cap and stem is a lovely red-orange to chestnut colour, compared to the usual yellow or orange with the the 'yellow' form.

Smell

Not distinctive.

Season

Autumn.

Habitat & Distribution

Exclusively with Larch (Larix), this variety of Larch Bolete is said to be more common in the western part of Scotland, but we have also seen it in Wales. 

Edibility

We do not like any of the Suillus family, there are far better species to target, but they are often eaten in Eastern Europe, where the slimy layer and top part of the cap are peeled off, the tubes removed and just the flesh of the cap which is very well cooked is used. 

Confusion Species

Spores 

6-11 x 3-4 μm. Subfusiform to broadly elliptical.

Spore Print Colour

Ochre.

The 'yellow' form of Larch Bolete (Suillus grevillei var. grevillei) is identical except for the colour, that form is never red-brown in the colour of the stem or cap. 

Tel. 07533 132 129 

Email. info@discoverthewild.co.uk

Manchester, Cheshire, Deeside & North Wales

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