Russula mairei

Beechwood Sickener

Status:

Common.

Meaning 'reddish'.

Cap:

4-9cm

Stem:

3-7cm

Named for Edouard Ernest Maire.

Description

Note: we are using mairei rather than nobilis which is used in some books, Kibby (2017) believes that this species is not the type description for nobilis described by Velenovskyi. 

A commonly encountered poisonous Brittlegill (Russula) species when walking through a Beech (Fagus) wood. There are many pink/red species of Brittlegill which we advise to avoid all of them for culinary purposes, unless you are very experienced in Brittlegill identification. Still retains the 'brittle gills' but has a much more robust stem than other pink/red species.

Smell

Slightly of coconut when young and fresh, but quickly becoming too faint.

Season

Autumn.

Habitat & Distribution

With Beech (Fagus) trees and common where they occur. 

Edibility

Poisonous.

Confusion Species

Spores 

7-8 x 5-6.5 μm. Prominent warts and often connected.

Spore Print Colour

White.

The Sickner (Russula emetica) is just as poisonous and looks very similar, but grows with Pine (Pinus) rather than Beech (Fagus).

Tel. 07533 132 129 

Email. info@discoverthewild.co.uk

Manchester, Cheshire, Deeside & North Wales

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