Suillellus queletii

Deceiving Bolete

Status:

Occasional in the South, Scarce in the North.

From suillus - pertaining to swine.

Cap:

5-20cm

Stem:

5-12cm

Named after 19th century French mycologist Lucien Quélet.

Description

Once seen it is a quite a distinctive species. The specimens in the photos above are young specimens so the pores are a more vibrant colour, with age they become a more orange-apricot. It is a variable species, but the colour of the stem base when cut in half is distinctive, a beetroot red. The base of the stem is often 'rooting' too.

Smell

Not distinctive.

Season

Late Summer to Autumn.

Habitat & Distribution

Said to prefer calcareous soils, found under Oak, Beech, Lime and Birch.

Edibility

Said to be edible if thoroughly cooked, but we consider it too unusual a find to justify picking for the pot. 

Confusion Species

Spores 

9-14 x 4-7µm. Ellipitical to subfusiform.

Spore Print Colour

Olivaceous.

The Lurid Bolete (Suillelus luridus) has a distinctive network on the stem, making it look like a net. 


The Scarletina Bolete (Neoboletus praestigiator) has red dots all over the stem which the Deceiving Bolete lacks, it also does not have the beetroot colour in the base of the stem flesh. 

Tel. 07533 132 129 

Email. info@discoverthewild.co.uk

Manchester, Cheshire, Deeside & North Wales

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